Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny

Review From User :

This is a brilliant academic treatise on man's inhumanity to woman. It should be required reading for every feminist. After a thorough treatment of academic and historical instances of misogyny, the author somewhat despairs of its ever being replaced by egalitarian discourse, much less behavior. I remember reading once that men are afraid that women will laugh at them, whereas women are afraid that men will kill them. Manne reviews several instances where husbands killed their wives basically out of fear of being humiliated.

The essence of the problem is that women are only allowed by society to be carers and givers, but if they presume to be alphas, they are immediately discounted and vilified. (See Clinton, Hillary; Warren, Elizabeth, and hosts of others). The attitude is so common and unconscious that even white women married to white men feel they have to uphold the standard of male dominance, since it's so ingrained in the culture that people of both genders rarely seem aware of it, much less critical of it.

The book is really academic, and I had to read each paragraph twice to apprehend the meaning correctly. I'll probably have to read it in its entirety once more to be sure I really get it. It is thoroughly convincing by both example and argument, and it agrees with my observations from my own life.

This is one of the best books I've read in 2017, and I've read a lot. One can only hope for a paradigm shift that looks possible by #metoo accounts of male sexual attacks on women over the past 20-some years.

Did I say it's a brilliant book


What is misogyny? And (why) is it still occurring? This book explores the logic of misogyny, conceived in terms of the hostilities women face because they are living in a man’s world, or one that has been until recently.
Expand text… It shows how misogyny may persist in cultures in which its existence is routinely denied – including the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom, which are often alleged to be post-patriarchal. Not so, Down Girl argues. Misogyny has rather taken particular forms following the advent of legal equality, obligating women to be moral “givers,” and validating a sense of entitlement among her privileged male counterparts. Many of rape culture’s manifestations are canvassed – from the ubiquitous entreaty “Smile, sweetheart!” to Donald Trump’s boasts of grabbing women by the “pussy,” which came to light during his successful 2016 presidential campaign; from the Isla Vista killings in California to the police officer in Oklahoma who preyed on African American women with criminal records, sexually assaulting them in the knowledge they would have little legal recourse; from the conservative anti-abortion movement to online mobbings of women in public life, deterring the participation therein of all but the most privileged and well-protected. It is argued on this basis that misogyny often takes the form of taking from her what she is (falsely) held to owe him, and preventing her from competing for positions of masculine-coded power and authority. And he, in turn, may be held to owe her little.

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)

Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny (Unabridged)